Red Coral Mediterranean Jewellery -France 2021.

“From Antiquity, and the discovery of gold, the Mediterranean basin saw the birth of vocations of jewelers. From the 17th century, they exported their creations all over the world, adapting to the tastes of their customers and winning without ceases in perfection.

A treasure of the seabed, Mediterranean red coral is widely used in jewelry making. In the hollow of the neck or the wrist, in earrings or in a necklace, “red gold”, reputed to bring good luck, still knows the same craze today.

Whatever its value, a piece of jewelry tells a story. It expresses a social status, a belonging to a religion, evokes a memory. This “memorial sign”, as Jean-Jacques Rousseau called it, is often part of a regional tradition.

In the 18th century, in the Arles region, future brides were offered the “coulas”, a bangle-type bracelet, in gold or silver, holding a chiseled medal. The coquetry of Arlésiennes stimulates the local silversmiths who compete in their know-how. The privileged relationship between Arles and the Order of Malta inspired them with sumptuous adornments. They revisit in particular the enamelled Maltese cross set with a diamond, to which they add a pendant in the shape of a teardrop.

A Latin cross for faith, an anchor for hope, a heart for charity, the Camargue cross created in 1926, whose ends recall the tridents of the gardians, has become the symbol of the Camargue soul.

Strengthened by their regional identity, jewelry has stood the test of time. Do we still know that the term “poissardes”, which nowadays designates ear pendants, refers to the fishmongers of Marseille, great lovers of jewelry?

“From Antiquity, and the discovery of gold, the Mediterranean basin saw the birth of vocations of jewelers. From the 17th century, they exported their creations all over the world, adapting to the tastes of their customers and winning without ceases in perfection.

A treasure of the seabed, Mediterranean red coral is widely used in jewelry making. In the hollow of the neck or the wrist, in earrings or in a necklace, “red gold”, reputed to bring good luck, still knows the same craze today.

Whatever its value, a piece of jewelry tells a story. It expresses a social status, a belonging to a religion, evokes a memory. This “memorial sign”, as Jean-Jacques Rousseau called it, is often part of a regional tradition.

In the 18th century, in the Arles region, future brides were offered the “coulas”, a bangle-type bracelet, in gold or silver, holding a chiseled medal. The coquetry of Arlésiennes stimulates the local silversmiths who compete in their know-how. The privileged relationship between Arles and the Order of Malta inspired them with sumptuous adornments. They revisit in particular the enamelled Maltese cross set with a diamond, to which they add a pendant in the shape of a teardrop.

A Latin cross for faith, an anchor for hope, a heart for charity, the Camargue cross created in 1926, whose ends recall the tridents of the gardians, has become the symbol of the Camargue soul.

Strengthened by their regional identity, jewelry has stood the test of time. Do we still know that the term “poissardes”, which nowadays designates ear pendants, refers to the fishmongers of Marseille, great lovers of jewelry?

The Postal Union for the Mediterranean (PUMed), created in Rome on March 15, 2011, by 14 postal operators from the Mediterranean region under the aegis of the Universal Postal Union (UPU), now has up to 23 members. .

The Euromed Postal stamp project is a joint commitment, consisting of the annual issue of a stamp on the same theme. In 2021, traditional jewels from the Mediterranean.

3 emblematic jewels from French Mediterranean departments illustrate the stamp.

The Maltese cross and its runner (Museon Arlaten)

The “coulas” bracelet (Museon Arlatan)

Coral ear pendant (MuCEM)

FRANCE 2021-RED CORAL JEWELLERY