15th (Isle of Man) LAA Regiment RA (TA) – 40th Anniversary of Mobilisation.

15th (Isle of Man) LAA Regiment RA (TA) – 40th Anniversary of Mobilisation.

The 15th (Isle of Man)  Light Anti Aircraft Regiment, Royal Artillery (Territorial Army) was raised in summer of 1938 as a Territorial Army Unit. At the beginning of World War II,  it consisted of two batteries (41st & 42nd) and Regimental headquarters. The regiment was partially equipped with Vickers, Lewis and Bofors Guns. Later on it was totally equipped with Bofors guns.

On 24 August 1939, The regiment was mobilised and sailed to Liverpool for the defence of the Mersey.

  • 129 Battery and Company ATS raised and joined the Regiment in England.
  • After the outbreak of  WW II the regiment deployed in Midlands and south-west England during the Battle of Britain.
  • On 19 Nov 1940 embarked for the Middle East and landed in Egypt.
  • 41 Battery sailed for East African theatre and took part in operations in Sudan, Eritrea and Abyssinia alongside 4th and 5th Indian Divisions and saw the surrender of Italian Forces.
  • 129 Battery was overrun by German Forces in Crete in May 1941.
  • 42nd battery and Regimental Headquarters were responsible for Air Defence of Suez Canal in Egypt.
  • In 1942, The Ist Battery of AA British Army with experience in Dunkirk joined the Regiment replacing 129 Battery.
  • On Jul 1942 joined the 7th Armoured Divison and took part in the Battle of Alamein.
  • From Oct 1942 moved through North Africa till the surrender of Enemy forces in North Africa (Libya, Tripoli & Tunisia)
  • Then moved to Italy from Salerno to Naples to Garigliano river.
  • In Jan 1944 returned to England, refitted and trained for Normandy Landings 0f 06 Jun 1944. Landed at Ouvranches and fought many battles in France, Belgium, Holland and finally to Hamburg for the surrender of German Forces.
  • Had the unique distinction of shooting down 300 aircraft, several tanks and infantry in light artillery role.

A Special Cover and Cancellation to commemorate the 40th Anniversary of Mobilisation issued on 24 Aug 1979 is listed.

IOM MOB ARTY
ISLE OF MAN 1979- 15th (IOM) LAA REGIMENT

 

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Paquebot Cover GB 1955 – Cunrad RMS Mauretania – Southampton

Paquebot Cover GB 1955 – Cunrad RMS Mauretania – Southampton

Under the UPU regulations, letters and cards posted at sea should be affixed with the postage stamps of the country under which the vessel is registered. the Postal rates of such country shall apply. If the vessel is at a port when the postcard or letter is handed over it is required to be affixed with stamps of the country in whose waters the vessel is docked. Though not stated in practice, letters with stamps of the country of last port of call are also accepted.

A Paquebot cover posted at Sea onboard Cunrad RMS Mauretania on 29 Jul 1955 with GB stamp postmarked and cancelled at Southampton seaport. The cover was to be delivered in the USA.

PAQUEBOT GB RMS MAURITANIA
PAQUEBOT GB 1955 -Cunrad RMS MAURETANIA
PAQUEBOT GB RMS MAURITANIA FRONT
PAQUEBOT GB 1955 -Cunrad RMS MAURETANIA

Paquebot Cover 1961 – RMS ANDES -Gothenburg

Paquebot Cover 1961 – RMS ANDES -Gothenburg

Under the UPU regulations, letters and cards posted at sea should be affixed with the postage stamps of the country under which the vessel is registered. the Postal rates of such country shall apply. If the vessel is at a port when the postcard or letter is handed over it is required to be affixed with stamps of the country in whose waters the vessel is docked. Though not stated in practice, letters with stamps of the country of last port of call are also accepted.

A Paquebot cover posted on high Seas onboard RMS Andes on 26 Jun1961 with GB stamp postmarked and cancelled at Goteberg or Gothenburg a Swedish seaport on27 Jun 1961. The cover was to be delivered in the USA.

PAQUEBOT GB ANDES GOTEBERG
PAQUEBOT GB 1961- RMS ANDES GOTEBERG.
PAQUEBOT GB ANDES GOTEBERG CANC
PAQUEBOT GB 1961- RMS ANDES GOTEBERG.

Paquebot Cover 1971 – Gothenburg

Paquebot Cover 1971 – Gothenburg

Under the UPU regulations, letters and cards posted at sea should be affixed with the postage stamps of the country under which the vessel is registered. the Postal rates of such country shall apply. If the vessel is at a port when the postcard or letter is handed over it is required to be affixed with stamps of the country in whose waters the vessel is docked. Though not stated in practice, letters with stamps of the country of last port of call are also accepted.

A Paquebot cover posted at Sea with GB stamp postmarked and cancelled at Goteberg or Gothenburg a Swedish seaport on 13 Sep  1971. The cover was to be delivered in England.

PAQUEBOT GB GOTEBERG
PAQUEBOT GB 1971- GOTEBERG

Paquebot Cover 1965 – RMS Andes -Helsinki -USA

Paquebot Cover 1965 – RMS Andes -Helsinki -USA

A Paquebot cover posted on the High seas on board RMS “Andes” with GB stamps &  postmarked and cancelled at Helsinki Finland on 24 Jul 1965. The cover was to be delivered in USA.

PAQUEBOT SS ANDES
PAQUEBOT RMS ANDES 1965

 

Paquebot Mail – Stamps and Cancellations on Paquebot Covers

Paquebot Mail – Stamps and Cancellations on Paquebot Covers

Today I wish to add another facet of Philately -The Paquebot Mail. It is also known by various other names across different countries and regions. These other names are “Ship Mail” in Australia, Posted at Sea in different countries, “Schiffsbrief” in Austria and Germany, “Pachhibot” in Italy, “Paketboot” in The Netherlands and its Colonies, “Paquete” in Portugal and its Colonies and “Paquetboat” in the United States.

This field of Philately is very interesting and let me assure you it can be mysterious to find all the information from every Paquetbot cover.

Under the UPU regulations, letters and cards posted at sea should be affixed with the postage stamps of the country under which the vessel is registered. the Postal rates of such country shall apply. If the vessel is at a port when the postcard or letter is handed over it is required to be affixed with stamps of the country in whose waters the vessel is docked. Though not stated in practice, letters with stamps of the country of last port of call are also accepted.

When a ship reaches a port the purser or postal officer delivers all the mail received during the voyage to the post office serving the port. The mail is then marked “Paquebot” or the equivalent and is postmarked by the post office and entered into the mail delivery system. A handstamp put on board the ship is not a postal marking.

The paquebot marking is often a straight line or boxed handstamp applied somewhere on the cover. Sometimes it is incorporated into a postmark or cancelling device. Even handwritten paquebot markings are acceptable, as long as it is written in ink.

Paquebot Mail – An Introduction

Paquebot Mail – An Introduction.

Today I wish to add another facet of Philately -The Paquebot Mail. It is also known by various other names across different countries and regions. These other names are “Ship Mail” in Australia, Posted at Sea in different countries, “Schiffsbrief” in Austria and Germany, “Pachhibot” in Italy, “Paketboot” in The Netherlands and its Colonies, “Paquete” in Portugal and its Colonies and “Paquetboat” in the United States.

This field of Philately is very interesting and let me assure you it can be mysterious to find all the information from every Paquetbot cover.

The Universal Postal Union (UPU) made special handling regulations for mail posted on the high seas abroad ocean-going vessels at the Vienna Conference in 1891 and further clarified at the Washington DC conference of the UPU in 1896.

Covers and Cards mailed at sea are generally referred to as “Paquebot Covers”.Paquebot is French for “Packet Boat” and the Postal administrations across the World use paquebot handstamps to mark mail received from a sea-going vessel that has no onboard post office.

Such a mail generally originates from Passengers or crew or it might be picked up at a port of call lacking postal facilities for onward transportation to the next port having postal facilities. Mail posted at sea is generally held by ship’s purser or postal officer until the next port with postal facilities is reached.